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Styles: a way of categorising your text Although section types are important in determining whether your material starts on a new page, and general formatting of the text (font style and size), it's also possible to set up styles in the Editing pane, so you can see what the finished effect might be. You can also finalise - or fine tune - the formatting once you reach the Compile stage. Paragraph formatting...

In the Scrivener Mindset series so far, I've focused on what goes in the Binder, and how your decisions can be carried through to Compile to achieve whatever formatting you want for the various output routes you need. If you've not read and absorbed this information, I recommend you check out these blog posts. You'll then be ready for what I am now going to address: what goes in the...

Louise Jensen My guest today is best selling author: Louise Jensen. Louise's stories have been translated into twenty-five languages and optioned for TV as well as featuring on the USA Today and Wall Street Journal Bestsellers List. And, her books have been nominated for multiple awards. As Louise, she writes psychological thrillers. Using a pen name, Amelia Henley, she has a penchant for exploring the intricacies of relationships through writing heart-breaking, high-concept love stories, and...

Project formats lead the way This blog post is the final one in a series all pointing to the fact that the role of a project format is to provide one of your many routes out of Compile. For a single manuscript, you can set up numerous project formats, each one serving a different purpose and/or a different end recipient. Here, I explain how, referring back to the previous posts which provide...

Specifying how your material will be formatted on output - the formatting controls - is achieved via Compile and, in the previous post, we examined all the panes apart from the first: Section Layouts. Brace yourselves! Deciding your requirements Before you select File / Compile, you need to have made a few decisions. What output route do I want? What do I want to output? What section layouts will I assign to...

achieved Formatting via Compile - the final frontier I explained in this blog post how formatting can be controlled at three levels. For all projects For this project For this document However, this formatting effort simply determines how your text looks in the Editing pane. What's more important is how your material will be formatted on output. That's achieved by formatting via Compile - for which you need your section types, your...

Scrivener provides a palette of section layouts Scrivener provides a palette of section layouts, so you have an array of formatting possibilities at your fingertips. Once you have set up your sections types (or accepted Scrivener's default settings) as per the previous post, then it's time to assign a section layout to each section type. From File / Compile, depending on the project format you chose when you first set up your project,...

Section types glue the Binder to section layouts I already published a blog post which explains the role of section types so why am I revisiting this topic? In this post, I go further: to explain how section types provide the link between the Binder (which you have nailed as per this blog post!) and the section layouts (which are the topic of the next post in this series). Section types provide the...

New page? Chapter title? Number? You decide!  If you have followed the advice I gave in the previous post, your Binder text will comprise titles for your folders and documents. And the text of your manuscript (minus any headings) will be visible in the Editing pane. If you feel happier seeing those titles in the Editing pane, select View / Text Editing / Show Titles in Scrivenings. There is also an options to...

The backbone of your project The Binder serves so many purposes, it's important to nail it. Include what you need. Leave out what you don't. Create a structure that makes sense for whatever you are publishing. The aim is always for clarity. Headings versus text Text can be separated into two types: headings; and the text which appears under those headings. In a novel, it's chapter titles that form the headings, and the scenes...